Recent Posts

What is Sorrel Used in Caribbean Punch?

What is Sorrel Used in Caribbean Punch?

This time of the year, down in the Caribbean island of Jamaica, Trinidad and Guyana, the locals are pulling out their pitchers and punch bowls to make the traditional holiday drink called sorrel punch. What’s sorrel, you ask? Don’t confuse it with the leafy spring green, as […]

Pear and Ginger Smoothie

Pear and Ginger Smoothie

What do you do with an abundance of pears from your tree? Make a smoothie! Perfect for breakfast, snacks or even a healthy dessert and it’s so easy the kids can help make it. This delicious Pear Ginger Smoothie is packed with healthy protein, fiber […]

Easy Poached Pears In Red Wine

Easy Poached Pears In Red Wine

Poached Pears in red Wine

August 6, 2018
: Easy

An easy Insta-pot/electric Pressure cooker recipe

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 bottle red wine of your choice
  • 1 Cup sugar
  • 1 large cinnamon stick
  • 1 lemon zested
  • 5 whole cloves
  • Dash of vanilla or almond extract
  • 4 Pears, slightly underripe
  • for any remaining pressure.
Directions
  • Step 1 1. Turn pressure cooker onto simmer or saute setting and stir together red wine, sugar, cinnamon, lemon zest, cloves and vanilla.
  • Step 2 2. Bring to a gentle simmer until sugar is dissolved and then turn pressure cooker off.
  • Step 3 3. Peel pears leaving the stems on.
  • Step 4 4. Add pears to the pressure cooker, lock lid, and set to high pressure for 6 minutes.
  • Step 5 5. When time is up, let pressure naturally release for 10 minutes, then do a quick release for any remaining pressure.
Twelve Tips for Making Roti-Caribbean Style Food

Twelve Tips for Making Roti-Caribbean Style Food

Do You want to make Roti that turns out right every time? Caribbean or Guyanese food can be complex, time consuming or strenuous to make if you are a newbie. It can take years of practice and acquired intuition to get a dish perfect on […]

Lamb Curry-Guyanese Style

Lamb Curry-Guyanese Style

This is the family favorite recipe- especially Ajah’s favorite recipe, and generally a good hit with everyone who comes over for dinner. So big a hit that lamb curry has become an addition to both Thanksgiving and Christmas, and most holiday meals, in addition to […]

Guyanese Bakes

Guyanese Bakes

These breads are deep-fried and are not greasy when properly cooked. Served with eggs at breakfast or eggplant (baigan choka) or pumpkin or Dhal.  Bake and eggs are some of my kids favorite breakfast. It confuses friends who think they’re being served bacon and eggs.

Guyanes Bakes

June 14, 2018
: 8
: 10 min
: 20 min
: 30 min
: Easy

A deep fried bread that pairs with eggs and Guyanese style veggies or Dhal!

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 cups self rising flour
  • (If using non-rising flour, use 1 tablespoon baking powder)
  • 1/2 tablespoon butter
  • 1 teaspoon Space brown sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • Vegetable or coconut oil for deep frying (About 2 cups)
Directions
  • Step 1 Mix flour and salt (and baking powder if not using self rising flour) in large mixing bowl.
  • Step 2 Add butter and sugar.
  • Step 3 Gradually add water, mixing to form a medium firm dough.
  • Step 4 Knead dough until it forms a small smooth ball, 5 to 10 minutes.
  • Step 5 On a floured surface, roll dough into a sausage shaped 1 1/2 inches in diameter.
  • Step 6 Cut into 8 1 1/2 inch pieces.
  • Step 7 Knead each piece in the palm of your hand for 30 seconds to form a smooth ball.
  • Step 8 Rollout each ball to 1/4 inch thickness.
  • Step 9 Heat vegetable oil (Coconut or olive) until very hot in deep pan , wok or small Guyanese Carahee. Test oil temperature by adding a pinch of dough: if it rises to the top immediately, oil is hot enough).
  • Step 10 Gently lower bake (rolled dough) into hot oil and cook until puffed and light golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes on each side, basting the top with oil to ensure even cooking.
  • Step 11 Repeat with remaining dough drain on paper towels and serve for breakfast.
Mix flour and salt (and baking powder if not using self rising flour)in large mixing bowl. Add butter and sugar. Gradually add water, mixing to form a medium firm dough. Need dough until it forms a small smooth ball, 5 to 10 minutes. On a floured surface, roll dough into a sausage shaped one and a half inches in diameter. Cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces. Need each piece in the palm of your hand for 30 seconds to form a smooth ball. Rollout each bake to 1/4 inch thickness. He oil until very hot in deep pan or walk. (Two test add a pinch of Deo: if it rises to the top immediately, oil is hot enough).Gently lower bake into a hot oil and cook until puffed and light golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes on each side, basting the top with oil to ensure even cooking. Repeat with remaining dough drain on paper towels and serve for breakfast.
Roti-Guyanese-Trinidadian-Caribbean Style

Roti-Guyanese-Trinidadian-Caribbean Style

Roti-Buss-Up Shut Roti is one of the Caribbean’s most famous culinary export whether you call it Roti like in Guyana and Jamaica, Paratha Roti or Buss-Up-Shut as they do in Trinidad. The secret to making good Roti and Roti dough is practice and portioning correctly […]

Caribbean Sorrel Cocktail-Drink Like a Caribbean

Caribbean Sorrel Cocktail-Drink Like a Caribbean

Drink Like  a Caribbean, No Passport Required In Guyana and the Caribbean, rum is the most popular liquor to drink. Of course, many in Guyana and the rest of the world know about El Dorado Rums, which have won international awards. I picked up a […]

The Caribbean Kitchen and Garden in America

The Caribbean Kitchen and Garden in America

Wiri Wiri Pepper

Long beans, Cassava,

Mangoes, Jackfruit, Cookrit, Awara, Jamoon, Sapodilla, Downs

Rum Swizzle, Mauby, Sorrel, Black Cake

How do three generations of a family’s Guyanese gardening and food traditions take root in America? ala Ajee’s House and Gardens, whose parents and grandparents grew food in their own yard in Cumberland, and Allness Village Guyana, using seeds harvested from their own gardens and organic techniques that Ajee’s family have incorporated into their own gardens.

There are many benefits of eating fresh produce. Whether your garden is in the small front yard in Washington DC, or multiple raised beds at Ajee’s House, everyone is capable of growing their own delicious, organic produce while getting the nutrition they need and enjoy tastier food. Many studies have shown that organically grown food have more minerals and nutrients that we need than food that has been grown with synthetic pesticides. There’s a good reason why many chefs use organic foods in their recipes; they taste better. Organic farming starts with the nourishment of the soil, which in turn leads to nourishment of the plant and ultimately our bodies.

The wiri wiri pepper seeds in Ajee’s garden were procured from a family garden in Florida. However, most of the seeds now being used are propagated from heirloom seeds and seeds from last year’s harvest.
Caribbean vegetables, herbs, and spices have held significance and symbolic meaning, and how the process of planting food for one’s family and eating the foods is key to preserving a sense of home and tradition, wherever you live.

There are certain signature ingredients, flavors, and stories of Caribbean-Guyana-Trinidad-Jamaica -Guadeloupe-Suriname-French Guiana-Grenada-St. Vincent-St. Kitts-St. Lucia cooking. When her kids were young, Ajee set out to explore and document her Indo-Guyanese-Caribbean ancestry and recipes as a way of tracing the stories and recipes of her parents and grandparents’ generation. It was also a way to pass on family traditions and heritage to her American born children. As we prepared a few dishes from Ajee’s site, we explored the complex social, political, and cultural history as that has led to Guyana’s distinctive cuisine, and how the dishes prepared by Guyanese and Caribbean-Americans honor the country’s rich traditions.

Caribbean and Guyana culinary traditions emerged from a commingling of Indian, African, Chinese, Portuguese migrants, European colonists, native peoples, from the Caribbean and it is how the region’s signature dishes represent its rich history.  Root vegetables known as “ground provisions” now constitute a national menu: crab or fish soups with plantains, eddoes, cassava, dasheen, and coconut milk; “cook-up rice” with black-eyed peas, pigs tail, green plantain, and cassareep; Chinese fried rice, Lo Mein and Indian curries and roti.

Guyana and the Caribbean complex social, political, and cultural history has led  to its distinctive cuisine, and how the dishes prepared by Caribbeans and Caribbean-Americans honor their country’s rich traditions.

 

 

Vegan Mitthai (Kurma)-Guyanese Style

Vegan Mitthai (Kurma)-Guyanese Style

This recipe is a wonderful recipe influenced by Travel and lipsticks. I and Guyanese in general eat these mostly at the end of religious functions with parsad.  Guyana, which is located in South American country is considered part of the Caribbean and shares much of the […]


My Diary

Bakes and Eggs-A Guyanese Breakfast

Bakes and Eggs-A Guyanese Breakfast

These fried breads are not greasy when properly cooked. Serve with scrambled eggs at breakfast or with Baigan choka, pumpkin (butternut squash) or dhal. My kids say their favorite breakfast is bake and eggs. Say that really fast and you can see how it confuses their friends who think they are being served bacon and eggs.

Guyanese Bakes

May 8, 2018
: 15 min
: 15 min
: 30 min
: Easy

A delicious breakfast bread with eggs.

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 Cups self-rising flour
  • *or use non-rising flour and 1 Tablesppon baking powder)
  • 1/2 tablespoon buttr or margarine
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 Cup (approximately) water
  • 2 Cups (Approx.) olive, coconut or vegetable oil for deep frying
Directions
  • Step 1 Mix flour and salt (and baking powder if using regular flour) in large mixing bowl.
  • Step 2 Add margarine and sugar.
  • Step 3 Gradually add water, mixing to form a medium firm dough.
  • Step 4 Knead dough until it forms a smooth ball, 5-10 minutes.
  • Step 5 On a floured surafce, roll dough into a sausage shape 1 1/2 inch in diameter.
  • Step 6 Cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces. (About 4-5 inches in diameter)
  • Step 7 Knead each piece in the palm of your hand to form a smooth ball.
  • Step 8 Let sit for a few minutes.
  • Step 9 Heat oil in a frying pan or wok until shimmering.
  • Step 10 Gently lower bake into hot oil and cook until puffed and lighter golden brown, 1 to minutes on each side, basting the top with oil to ensure even cooking.
  • Step 11 bake should have puffed up.
  • Step 12 Repeat with remaining dough.
  • Step 13 Drain on paper towels .
  • Step 14 Serve hot with eggs or Dhal or Guyanese style pumpkin/butternut squash.


Life is Sweet

Vegan Mitthai (Kurma)-Guyanese Style

Vegan Mitthai (Kurma)-Guyanese Style

This recipe is a wonderful recipe influenced by Travel and lipsticks. I and Guyanese in general eat these mostly at the end of religious functions with parsad.  Guyana, which is located in South American country is considered part of the Caribbean and shares much of the […]

To Die For Guyanese Black Cake (Fruit or Christmas Cake)

To Die For Guyanese Black Cake (Fruit or Christmas Cake)

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam ornare elementum varius. In viverra pulvinar augue, ac hendrerit enim volutpat ac. Donec imperdiet pellentesque commodo.

Pineapple Tarts-A Caribbean Treat

Pineapple Tarts-A Caribbean Treat

Pineapple tarts commonly called pine tarts by Guyanese is a delicious pastry! Whenever my sisters-in-law from New York visit, they bring these amazing treats to share. It is difficult to eat just one and they almost always disappear in less than a day, no matter […]

Guyanese Black Cake (Christmas Cake)

Guyanese Black Cake (Christmas Cake)

This Caribbean fruit cake is made during the holidays by many homes throughout the Caribbean and in Guyana. My mother always called this “pound cake” because her recipe calls for a pound of just about every ingredient in it. When I was a child, and […]